” But the process doesn’t necessarily help form strong relationships.

Browsing through profile after profile “can result in the objectification of potential partners,” the study says.

But the bigger problem is that no profile can transmit the full essence of a human being.

pro con online dating-75

The advent of the Internet and inception of in 1995 prompted a sea change.

For a few years, online dating seemed like the bastion of the geeky and desperate, but the stigma passed. couples who formed relationships between 20, 22 percent of them met online, one academic study found.

Similarly, the report says, “people become cognitively overwhelmed” as they scan dozens of profiles.

“You end up a bit less satisfied with the thing you choose — like your chocolate or romantic partner.

And the average online dater spends 12 hours a week at the endeavor.

“It really feels like a full-time job sometimes,” says Frances Correa, a 24-year-old reporter, who lives in Northwest Washington and stopped online dating after four years.

“Maybe after 50 different guys you’ve been conversing with, one might be worth a date.” What’s more, it’s not always good to have more choices.

In one oft-cited experiment, people who chose a sample from six kinds of chocolate were more satisfied with their treat than those who chose from 30 options.

Social scientists have confirmed what most singletons have known for years: Online dating is a crapshoot. But the sites also reduce daters into two-dimensional profiles and often overwhelms them with potential choices. It gives opportunities to singles who otherwise wouldn’t have them,” says Eli J.

A new analysis of 400 academic studies explores whether online dating represents a dramatic shift in the way people seek mates (it does) and whether it is ultimately a good thing for daters (eh . Some sites claim to have developed scientific algorithms that can help people find soul mates, an assertion the study’s five authors say is not possible and could be damaging. Finkel, an associate professor of social psychology at Northwestern University and the study’s lead author.

Monika Lupean, a 54-year-old yoga instructor from Maryland, has experienced that problem repeatedly in her four years of online dating.